Dec 042017
 

On Saturday afternoon on December 2nd, following a long day of work, I pedaled slowly on my bicycle down Dumaine street in Treme, headed towards Claiborne Avenue. The previous month, I had tried to make the first-ever Treme Farmer’s Market but missed it as the market was breaking down early after a long day. As I reached Ms. Gloria’s Garden and walked my bicycle into the yard, I quickly realized that my luck was the same for the second market. The garden space was mostly empty, and some folks were still in the middle of packing up. Still, I was curious to learn more about the market. Everyone was friendly and greeted me as I walked through. As I gazed around at the garden beds that were raised up to waist level and flush with vegetables, a lively older woman wearing a black hooded sweatshirt greeted me warmly. She started to mention that the market was closing down because it was getting cold out, but they would be back there again in a month. I quickly realized that it was Ms. Gloria! Ms. Gloria told me that I was welcome to come back whenever to get some vegetables that she would pick fresh straight from the garden. She explained that she gave away vegetables to anyone who was hungry, and pointed out the space where an herb garden would soon be for the children in the neighborhood to take care of.

Ms. Gloria in her garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second Treme Farmer’s Market had about eight vendors overall, and four of them were farmers. Ms. Gloria hopes to have more in the future after other farmers have had more time to grow additional crops for the market. The market happens every first Saturday from 11 a.m. to around 4 p.m. in the winter at Ms. Gloria’s Garden, located at 814 N. Claiborne. I hope that I can make the next market!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re a farmer and you’re interested in participating in the market, or you’d like to volunteer, e-mail bwblouisiana@gmail.com. To donate to the garden, here is the gofundmepage: https://www.gofundme.com/gloriastremegarden.

Jun 292016
 

Every year I look forward to planning the urban farm bike rides for the Eat Local Challenge. There are so many enthusiastic growers in this city, and they are happy to show off their hard work to our participants—even in the June heat (although someone usually grumbles about how their garden “isn’t looking great because it’s June”). And each year, there are new farms and gardens that pop up and are brimming with growth. This year, however, things didn’t go quite according to plan. We made a difficult decision and canceled the bike ride on June 4th due to predicted severe weather. The following day, the storm missed us. Thankfully, most of the farms were available and were so kind to accommodate us and we were able to reschedule for the following Saturday.

The ride began at the Eat Local Challenge headquarters, the Zeitgeist in Central City. Everyone started meeting up around 10 am, and over 30 cyclists took off at 10:30 and headed towards Agrowtopia.

Start at Zeitgeist

Agrowtopia is located on the Xavier University campus in Gert Town. The farm was founded by Xavier students to provide fresh, affordable produce to students, staff, local residents, and the general public. Agrowtopia farmers spoke about the challenges they faced with their shallow beds and soil quality. During the school year, students help them with farm tasks. Agrowtopia has an online store that is updated every Monday afternooon. Customers can select their purchases and arrange a pickup time. The university farm also sells their produce to several restaurants.

flowers agrowtopia

agrowtopia sign

even a dog came

The bike ride had a four-legged participant this year!

lotsa mint

An entire bed of mint

crowd listens sprout nola

Participants gather to listen to Agrowtopia farmers

moth agrowtopia

rescue dog enjoys view

The second stop was at First Grace Community Garden in Mid-City. First Grace is part of First Grace United Methodist Church. Community garden members do not need to be a part of the church to have a plot in the garden.

first grace comm garden sign

flower background comm grace

purple flower comm grace

The gardens were filled with a variety of stunning flowers

community grace gardens

purple kale comm grace

Purple kale

flower berries comm grace

For the third stop, the ride breezed on down the new Lafitte Greenway to the Refresh Community Farm of SPROUT NOLA, which has two garden plots outside of the Whole Foods Market on Broad Street. SPROUT is led by Emily Mickley-Doyle and Faubourg Farms also has a plot on site as well. SPROUT is a teaching farm that has a mission of increasing fresh food access to an area that was previously deemed a food desert. The organization collaborates with the Refresh Project, which is an innovated fresh food hub with several programs that focus on providing affordable and healthy food through community education, training, and events. The farm provides gardening classes for people of all ages, garden plots for community members, farm apprenticeships, as well as a Volunteer for Veggies program. The gardens plant herbs, flowers, and vegetables for community members outside of their fenced gardens. People can harvest the food at any time of the day at no charge. The farm even grows moringa, an incredibly nutritious and resilient plant.

sprout nola sign

sprout nola fence

monarch butterfly

overlooking sprout garden

harvesting guidelines sprout

edamame sprout

flowers with participant in bg

fun purple flower

sprout nola crowd gathers

krewe de lose garden club sprout

butternut squash growing

Butternut squash

moringa tree sprout

moringa

The final stop ended at Southbound Gardens‘ greenhouse in Uptown on S. Robertson St., near Napoleon and Claiborne. Farmers Jordan Bantuelle and Ian Willson sold $1 plant starts that they grow in their greenhouse and told everyone a little bit about their gardens and weekly workshop offerings. Southbound also offers several Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) options.

seedlings southbound

greenhouse all plants

seedlings sprouted

beehive

Ian and Jordan team up with a beekeeper and occasionally sell honey at their garden parties

southbound farmers

Farmers Ian Willson and Jordan Bantuelle pose for a photo with participant Brooke Bullock

Slice served up a delicious all local kale salad with beets, goat cheese, and pecans. Thank you Slice for this incredible salad!

slice local salad

Thank you to everyone who came out to the first urban farm bike ride, and a big thanks goes out to all of the farms who took the time on their Saturday to host us!

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May 162016
 

Why NOLA Farms is thrilled to be involved with the planning process of the urban farm bike rides that the Eat Local Challenge hosts each year, along with volunteers from the NOLA Social Ride. This year will mark our committee’s fourth year of putting on the rides, and will be our sixth and seventh rides in total (each year we do two rides, one at the beginning of June and one at the end, with the exception of last year). Once again, we will be stopping by lots of new farms and gardens for both of the rides, and we are very excited for the rides we have planned for you all!

RIDE #1 – *RESCHEDULED* JUNE 11th (CENTRAL CITY/GERT TOWN/MID-CITY)

Meetup 10:00 AM: Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center (1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.)
Depart 10:30 AM

Stop #1 – 11:00 AM: Agrowtopia (1045 S. Genois St.)
Depart 11:30 AM

Stop #2 – 11:45 AM: First Grace Community Garden (3401 Canal St.)
Depart 12:15 PM

Stop #3 – 12:45 PM: ReFresh Community Farm (300 N. Broad St.)
Depart 1:15 PM

End Stop #4 – 1:45 PM: Southbound Gardens (4221 S. Robertson St.)

There will be a light meal at the end, with produce supplied by Hollygrove Farm & Market and food cooked by Slice!

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RIDE #2 – JUNE 25th (MARIGNY/BYWATER/LOWER 9):

9:45 AM: Press Street Gardens (7 Press St.)

Garden Tour at Press Street Gardens Begins at 10:15 AM
Ride Departs 10:45 AM

Stop #1 – 11:15 AM: Owl City Farm
Depart 11:45 AM

Stop #2 – 12:15PM: Garden on Mars
Depart 12:45 PM

Stop #3 – 1:15 PM: Grow On

End Stop #4 – 2:00 PM: Okra Farm (Industrial Ct.)
There will be a party at the end, with a light snack provided. It’s just a short ride from Okra Farm back to Press St.!

As always, we will be passing by and pointing out as many smaller gardens as we can.

Please be prepared, and bring your own supplies! We will have someone driving a truck to carry supplies from stop to stop. Please make sure your bike is in working order, and bring basic repair items such as a tube, pump, wrenches, patch kit, etc. in case of any mechanical issues.

Please note that everyone is individually responsible for safe operation of their bicycles and for following all traffic laws at all times while on public streets. Ample time has been included in the schedule to ensure that everyone can travel at a comfortable pace. Personal safety equipment (helmets and lights) are encouraged. Handouts will be provided at Zeitgeist with a map of all the garden stops, and a live tracker will be posted for anyone that wants to catch up and join at any point!

We look forward to exploring many pockets of local edible flora on our most sustainable, efficient method of travel available: Pedal Power! Come discover a few of our many local urban garden and farms!

Apr 022014
 

growing local nola sign

On Monday evening, New Orleans Food & Farm Network and Recirculating Farms Coalition hosted a special preview of their plans for the upcoming food and urban farm center Growing Local NOLA in the Central City lot located at 1750 Carondelet. The site will soon serve as the new location for the offices of both organizations. From community growing spaces and outdoor farm to table cooking classes, Growing Local NOLA has a lot in store for New Orleans residents. Continue reading »

Mar 272014
 

In May of 2013, I first met Ica Crawford at the Bayou Boogaloo festival inside the giant Slow Food tent on the banks of Bayou St. John. She was representing Our Garden, a non-profit organization she established. I was excited to discover a new urban agriculture organization. My eyes immediately jumped to the interactive display behind her. Hay, dirt, and seed packets lay on top of the table, surrounded by rocks, brochures, and information about the biological structure of plants. Impressed, I turned to Ica to learn more, “What’s a seed bomb?” Ica explained that a seed bomb contained clay, hay, dirt, and a seed. One simply places a seed bomb on a vacant lot, and with water, the seed will grow and bring life and food to the space. Ica handed me a packet that contained a basil seed and one of the detailed brochures. Continue reading »